FORUM NEWS

Keystone bill dies in the Senate -- for now

The US Senate blocked a measure Tuesday that would have authorized construction of the Keystone XL pipeline as Democrats chose their pro-environment base over an old friend -- embattled Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu.  

See Who Voted For the Keystone Pipeline, and Who Didn't

U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes on S.2280 ("A bill to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline.") November 18, 2014, 05:55 PM. YEAs: 59, NAYs: 41. Alphabetical by Senator Name:  

Florida U.S. Senator Bill Nelson key to future of Keystone Pipeline

Florida Sen. Bill Nelson is being viewed as a possible key vote as the U.S. Senate decides whether or not to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline. The more than 1,100-mile pipeline is proposed to carry up to 830,000 barrels of oil through the Midwest and into Gulf of Mexico ports for refinement  

Republican-controlled House passes legislation approving the Keystone XL oil pipeline

Congress inched closer Friday to a possible showdown with President Barack Obama over the Keystone XL oil pipeline as the Republican-controlled House approved the project. Supporters in the Democratic-run Senate predicted they will get the 60 votes needed to pass it next week  

House approves Keystone XL pipeline, Senate up next

U.S. House approved legislation, 252-161, for the ninth time to authorize construction of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline  

Bill Nelson, Potential Keystone Pipeline Convert?

Even before the new Senate is seated, the $8 billion Keystone XL Pipeline is a hair's-breadth from becoming a major triumph for its bipartisan supporters. All it needs is a commitment from two more on-the-fence Democratic senators -- and Florida's Bill Nelson is one of the targets.... Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA) pushing for it hard against the wishes of President Obama...  

Keep pushing for energy independence

Without much fanfare, the United States has now met its own domestic natural gas needs, while also becoming the world's No. 1 exporter of natural gas. At the same time, Americans still consume far more oil than our currently available domestic resources can supply.  

Ret. Commander Tom Garcia (Vets4Energy Chaiman): "We need to drill for more oil to stay on road to energy independence"

Without much fanfare, the United States now meets its own domestic natural gas needs, while also becoming the world's No. 1 exporter of natural gas. At the same time, Americans still consume far more oil than our domestic resources can supply.